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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"

K,'„?^,!, UBL,C1 -'BRARY 



I 
3 9999 06545 805 9 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi1957mass 



ANNUAL REPORT 

for the Year ending June 30, 1957 

for the 

DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

of the 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



The year which closed June 30, 1957 was the thirty-eighth year of the 
work of the Division of Immigration and' Americanization as a part of the 
State Department of Education, However, the State work for immigrants and 
those of foreign origin residents in the Commonwealth began in July, 1917 
when the Bureau of ]jnmigration was established so that for forty years the 
Commonwealth has had a particular interest in the foreign born within its 
borders. 

The duties of the Division under the present law, Chapter 1*09 of the 
Acts of 1939 are as follows: 

"The Division of immigration and .Americanization shall 
employ such methods consistent with law, as in its 
judgment, will tend to bring into sympathetic and 
mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth and its 
residents of foreign origin, protect immigrants from 
exploitation and abuse^ stimulate their acquisition 
and mastery of English^ develop their understanding 
of American government, institutions and ideals and 
generally promote their assimilation and naturali- 
zation". 

The Division recorded lp.,552 services to clients in the past year # 
Of this number, 26,609 were listed for the Boston Office \ 3,5kl for the 
Fall River Office; 2,865 for the Lawrence Office; h 9 hk5 for Springfield 
and 1;,086 for Worcester • The number of services are about 1,500 more 
than last year. With the lessening- of the work under the Refugee Relief 
Act which expired December 31> 1956, the new refugee program for 
Hungarians began. 

As of January, 1957 5 as reported under the Alien Registration Act. of 
the 2,826,9i|l aliens in the United States^ Massachusetts recorded 129,uli9, 
an increase over last year, due, no doubt;, to the immigrants admitted under 
the refugee laws. The nationalities in the State as listed in the 1956 
listing (as the 1957 breakdown is not yet available) is: 



1;8,828 


Britain and Canada 


16,7U3 


Italian 


23' 9 2h0 


I-oJish 


h,508 


German 


3,93$ 


Greek 


It, 326 


U.S.S.R. 


1,178 


China 


1*2,257 


All Others. 



- 2 - 



Nationality and Ethnic Background of Clients 

Of the fifty-five nationalities served, the Italian born clients, 
although many of them naturalized citizens, were largest in number. We 
recorded Q 9 $kk services for them, some 2,500 less than last year. No doubt 
it was because of the close of the refugee law and assurances no longer are 
being filled for relatives in Italy . We have many newcomer problems in the 
Italian group. Those born in the United States were next - 5^977 » Many 
U. S. born citizens make documents to assist in bringing relatives from 
abroad. We still have among the returning servicemen from abroad, those who 
come to make papers to send for their fiancees abroad. Those married abroad 
come for papers to send for their relatives through marriage c Quite a 
number of U c S. born girls who married students or exchange visitors or 
temporarily admitted seamen who are our applicants account for some of this 
figure. The Uj250 services to Canadian born applicants, next in number, 
could be attributed to citizenship applications, assistance in making 
af f idavits of support and procuring proper travel documents to visit across 
the border. 

We had 2,860 services to Irish born; 2,018 to Great Britain bornj' 
2,035 to those born in Polandj and 1,21+7 born in U.S.S.R. as well' as 1,752 ' 
to Greeks and 1,909 of Portuguese birth. The French, Lithuanians, Latvians, 
Yugoslavs are represented in notable numbers. 

Hungarians 

We had 368 services to persons born in Hungary as compared to 86 for 
the year 1956. 28,366 Hungarian refugees who fled their Homeland since 
October 23, 1956 have been given asyltm in the United States; 22,156 of them 
on parolee basis. 692 are listed as destined to Massachusetts. The 
problems of the Hungarians are many© Besides having :o overcome the language 
difficulty, their status as parolees does not permit them such privileges as 
naturalization or travel out of the United States temporarily. Only new 
immigration legislation would remedy this inequity. There are many separated 
families. In some cases, in the same family seme were sent to Europe and 
the others to the United States. Ihose whose family remained in Hungary 
have little hope for reunion under present laws. 

One young Hungarian Freedom Fighter, cne of the earlier arrivals who 
entered the United States with a regular visa for permanent residence in the 
United States, has joined the U. S. Army with the hope that he would get 
U. S. citizenship sooner. Therefore, as a citizen he could petition to have 
his wife come from Hungary, outside the small Hungarian quota 

The public school classes reflected their attendance to overcome this 
barrier. The language problem was a difficult one for the Hungarians as for 
many newcomers. Several of the Vol^iK^ry Agencies who had assisted in 
bringing the Hungarians to the United States established private classes. 
Many of the refugees were of the professional group and tradesmen. Lack of 
English was the great barrier in job procurement. These accelerated classes 
which met almost nightly were well attended. 



- 3 - 

Since May of this year, Hungarian refugees in countries of second 
asylum in Europe, including the United Kingdom, are being permitted to cone 
to the United States as Parolees* Formerly, only Hungarian Refugees in 
Austria were being processed to come to the United States, 

Under the present directive,' eligible Hungarian Parolees will be 
restricted to those who establish, after interview and check by the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service officers, that they fled Hungary after 
October 23, 1956; have not returned to Hungary since that date; who meet the 
definition of "escapee" contained in the Refugee Relief Act; and who are 
admissible to the United States under all of the provisions of the Immigra- 
tion laws except they lack passports and visas. Priority is to be given to 
husbands, wives, minor children, parents of minor children of those previous- 
ly admitted to the United States since October, 1956 and members of their 
immediate household and to other relatives of aliens or citizens in the 
United States with unusual and appealing equities. Priority is also to be 
given to those with unusual skills or talents which may be considered vital 
in the National Interest, 

We have already assisted a number of relatives in making the necessary 
affidavits to send to the Immigration and Naturalization Service in 
Yfashington in uheir desire to have their relatives join them from abroad, as 
this regulation provides. 

Work of the Division 

Our services are divided into four major categories - the giving of 
information, mainly on immigration and citizenship problems - (16,1$ 2 such 
services recorded this year); assistance in filling forms required by the 
Federal Inmigration and Naturalization authorities as part of naturaliza- 
tion proceedings or in connection with immigration proceedings - (9->221 for 
this year); execution of affidavits -' {k 9 hP$ services recorded)' and other 
services which include interpretation, translation of documents, writing 
letters to various agencies and assistance in immigration cases to adjust 
status from a temporary or irregular one to a permanent resident Such 
latter services totaled 8,526, We assisted newcomers in their integration 
by interviews - 2,918 during the year. 

We leaning the Newcomer 

This Division continues to send to each newcomer to this State from 
abroad, a letter of welcome and offering the services of the Division, in 
their assimilation to life in the DJuitod States, Many of the replies to 
these letters result in referrals to schools for educational opportunities. 






. 



























Immigration problems 

The termination of the Refugee Relief Act which ended December 31, 195>6 
left many relatives disappointed because there were no more numbers available 
for issuance of immigrant visas even though the necessary assurances had 
been accepted and even processed by the U, S, Consulates abroad,, This situa^- 
tion is particularly noted in Italy and Greece. Brothers and sisters who 
were beneficiaries of petitions and then assurances on forms DSR-11 were 
reverted to their priority of the fourth preference category. Because of 
the large number of applicants in the prior categories in Italy and Greece, 
the Visa Division of the Department of State in charge of issuing visa 
numbers, does not attempt to estimate when the turns of such applicants will 
be reached. Spouses and minor children of legally admitted aliens are given 
their preferential category in the quota. In Italy, applicants in sue 1 :, a 
category registered prior to February 1, 19^3 are getting their turn. In 
Greece, those registered with priority of January 1, 19ltf are getting their 
turns I A brother in fourth preferential category in Portugal still awaits 
his turn although he has priority registration since I9I46; 

The situation has resulted getting the interest of several legislators 
who have "filed bills in Congress which, if enacted, would help re-unite 
families. 

One family reunion is being solved in the only way possible under 
present laws, by enactment of a private bill; The case concerns a sixteen 
year old girl who, as a foundling of 11 days, was taken into the home of an 
Italian couple who already had several children. The child was reared by 
the couple as their own and they took guardianship papers through the 
Italian Courts, assuming all responsibilities for' the child, Under Italian 
Law, because the couple had children of their own, they were not permitted 
to legally adopt the child, A foster brother had come to the United States 
and was already a citizen of the united States when the Refugee Relief Act 
came into effect. As a citizen, he made the necessary papers for all the 
members of hi:: family to join him in the United States, except his foster 
sister who could not come under the regulations. She faced separation from 
her family. Private legislation enacted in her behalf gives her preferen- 
tial status and she can hope to join her family. 

Change of status under "pre-examination" proceedings has solved the 
problems of quite a few American born wives married to aliens who 'were 
here on temporary status as students, exchange visitors or seamen. Under 
this procedure, 'if the spouse has lived in the United States since before 
January 1, 1957, the U,S, citizen, by making the necessary petitions and 
applications in behalf of the alien to sane Consul in nearby Canada^ he is 
given proper papers assuring him in advance of issuance of visa to him. We 



help to assemble the necessary documents and correspond with the Consuls in 
Canada and arrange the appointments vfith the Consuls and the U. S. Immigra- 
tion Service, 

Up to this year, those persons in the United States as Exchange 
Visitors or Exchange Students were not permitted to change their status but 
had to depart from the United States at the end of their program* Many of 
these persons had married U, S. citizens • Many were vitally needed in 
critical occupations, as engineers, doctors, nurses, etc. During the past 
year, the restrictions have been removed so that such an exchange visitor 
or student who is in legal status in the United States and who has had no 
extension of time granted him since September 19, 195>6 ^fho arflved In the ' 
U.S.' prior ,: 6/lj/l£56j and i £ he is cither the spouse of a citizen of the 
United States or the beneficiary of an approved petition by a sponsor who 
requires his skills, he is permitted to change status to that of a permanent 
resident in the United States. We have had quite a few applications made 
under this procedure. We assisted in assembling documents, translations, 
correspondence with sources for necessary records and appearances at 
hearings in their behalf with the U. S. Immigration Service. 

Many relatives continue to make affidavits of support to help their 
relatives cane to the United States as from Ireland, Canada 'and Great 
Britain where there is no question of getting quota numbers. 

Lately we are having inquiries and have' filed papers for "close rela- 
tives in Iron Curtain countries as Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Relatives 
from these countries are now being able to correspond with persons in the 
United States. Although the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization Service ' 
has approved petitions to establish preferential quota category for parents, 
sisters and brothers, not one has yet been successful in obtaining the 
necessary exit permit to depart from these countries. 

However, during the past year, several families from Poland have been 
united after many years of separation. Even though under U. S. Immigration 
Laws, after proper petition, the spouse of a % S. citizen is accorded non 
quota status, the Polish authorities made it most difficult to obtain the 
necessary exit permit and passport. Such was- the case of a Chelsea, 
Massachusetts resident who had come to the United States in l^ltf. His 
efforts and correspondence with the authorities abroad had bessi going on 
for eight years. It was indeed a happy reunion at the airport a few months 
ago with his wife and children. 

World tensions, rigid rules of Iron Curtain countries who shut off 
kinsfolk, as well as inadequate quotas for numbers of applicants who desire 
to come to the United States will present problems for the foreign born in 
our Commonwealth yet for some time. 



-6 *. 



Pending Immigration Legislation 

Now that the closing of the eight y-fifth Congress draws near, there 
seems to leave little hope this yea^ for enactment of legislation advocating 
reunion of families, granting Hungarian Parolees the privilege to adjust to 
permanent resident status, bring orphan children to the United States, make 
permanent a section in the immigration laws applicable to "escapees" from 
behind the Iron Curtain, take away mortgages from quotas placed there during 
the Displaced Persons Act, and other provisions deemed applicable . There 
are many such bills sponsored by various Congressmen designed to supplement 
the present Immigration and Naturalization Laws* 

Citizenship 

Although problems in citizenship are secondary in number to immigration, 
nevertheless, it is an important phase of our work* Our offices filed'3«ll6 
applications for naturalization; 688 applications to get proof of U. S. 
Citizenship as well as answered many inquiries clarifying citizenship statuc 
Citizenship problems may be the simple one of filling an application for 
naturalization and help for that process ; or it may be to help to determine 
whether the applicant has a claim to citizenship. It may be a question of 
loss of citizenship by residence abroad; by foreign military service j by 
voting abroad or some other situation vfhich may jeopardize the citizenship 
claim. 

The many changes in citizenship laws and regulations make it imperative 
that a trained' person familiar with the laws on immigration, as well as 
naturalization, assist our clients in their problems* Many applications for 
citizenship have resulted in subsequent immigration proceedings* 

' So it was in the case of a Canadian born adult, now about forty years 
old, who had lived in the United States since early childhood* He went to 
school in the United States, married and had a family. He neglected to get 
naturalized. Unfortunately, he "became ill and had to be hospitalized in a 
State hospital for tuberculosis* After he was cured at the hospital, he was 
advised to recuperate at a farm* His relatives in Canada invited him and he 
visited Canada for a few months and then returned to his home and family in 
the United States. He could not go to work for a while and was the recipient 
of public welfare aid. These facts were disclosed in'his application for 
naturalization for which he applied a' few years later. Although he had ]ivod 
in the United States most of his life, the fact that he did receive publio 
aid within five years of entry into the United States (his return from his 
visit to Canada-* from causes arising before entry, he was deportable from 
the United States. In this case, with the help of relatives, the bill was 
settled v/ith the Welfare Department, /-iit migration proceedings stopped and he 
was subsequently naturalized© 



~ 7 " 

The recently adnitted aliens, as those who caac to the Ifcltdd States 
under the Displaced persons Act, do net fail to take advantage of asking 
for the privilege of naturalization as soon as possible • The past two 
years showed notable increase in naturalization figures and it is attributed 
to their applications for naturalisation* 

Most of' the applications for certificates of citizenship, of which we 
have had 688, were for minor children o£ the more recently admitted aliens 
who had become naturalized* 

We continue to assist applicants to get first papers (Declaration of 
Intention). Although this is not required wncter the present laws, it has 
been necessary for seme persons to have it to join unions and for many & 
young man who has joined the U. 3, Army shortly after admission to the 
United States. 

Cooperation with Other Agencies 

The Division cooperates with social agencies, public and private* We 
have inquiries and referrals frcm public welfare divisions, social security 
offioe and registrars of voters to give 'specialised technical infomation 
on citizenship and immigration problems. Our relations with the 'various 
sponsoring agencies working with the refugees and, most recently, with the 
Hungarian refugees, have been most cooperative and JHutually helpful. The 
constant cooperative relationship with the &&ult Civic Education group both 
with the local supervisors and the State Director continues. As a me»ber of 
the United Community Service, Committee for the Foreign Born, we participate 
in meeting and ecumittees regarding the problems of the foreign bom. lie 
Division was prominent in a recent Conference on 3Ssmigration Policy sponsored 
by various agencies concerned in the work with dj&Riflppaaats. Our relations 
with the Federal Immigration and Naturalization Services continues with 
cooperation and assistance from that Service. 

fhe many calls for services at our offices in increasing numbers without 
publicity or advertising ©ur work, points how successfully have been our 
efforts in fulfilling the duty of the Divisiem to "bring into sympathetic and 
mutually helpful relations the Consonweaith aad its residents of foreign 
birth". The World situation, threats of the Atom and hydrogen 3tob, the fear 
of Caanunist infiltration continue t© make imperative the work of the Division. 



* 



- 8 - 



REPORT OF THE BRANCH OFFICES 
FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957 
with a total of 3,5U7 services to clients. These resident clients came 
from 32 localities seeking some typo of services which this office rendered* 
This total of 3,£li7 is an increase in services amounting to l£)8 for the 
previous fiscal year 

The bulk of the time consuming operations at the Fall River Office is 
the numerous inquiries of clients seeking information on Citizenship, 
]jnmigration, Travel and Newcomer Problems 9 The writing of letters to local, 
State and Federal agencies, also to State Department, Foreign Service 
Officers throughout the world* The completing of applications for lost 
naturalization certificates, alien registration cards, assisting visitors 
and foreign students with their problems* 

Seme notable increases are that 327 applications for United States 
citizenship were completed at this office, an increase of !|0 over the 
previous fiscal year* Affidavits of support amounting to 133, an increase 
of $, and a total of l5f> Immigration applications, an increase of 28* 

While these applications for Citizenship and Immigration Services are 
the meat of our work, other services are just as important. Deportation 
hearings are held before Special 'Inquiry Officers of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service at Boston* On four separate occasions, this 
District Agent represented clients who were in a deportable status* Appli- 
cations for Suspension of Deportation were filed in each case, two of these 
cases were referred to the Congress of the United States as required by Law* 
These two cases received favorable action and the two clients are now apply- 
ing for Citizenship* The remaining two cases" received the only adequate 
relief in the filing of a Stay of Deportation, under Section 2l;3(h)* This 
was the only relief the Snmigration and Naturalization Service would render* 
These two clients are presently in the United States in a vacuum status. 

With the expanding operations of the Otis Air Force Base on the Cape 
and the closing of the Federal Office at New Bedford two years ago, a large 
number of clients from the Cape Cod area are now seeking the services of 
the Fall River Office* This Agent does make weekly visits, every Wednesday, 
to New Bedford and the people in this area look forward to this weekly 
visit* It is usually a full day of work and at times it appears more time 
should be spent in the New Bedford area. In the event increased services 
are required in this area, it appears to this Agent that steps will be taken 
by the Supervising Body and The Board to correct any hardship in rendering 
added services© 



- 9 ~ 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The Lawrence Office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957 
with an increase in services to clients to 2,865 from the previous year's 
total of 2,789. 

Clients came to the Lawrence Office from 33 localities, up from the 
29 localities served in the previous year and the 23 localities served in 
the 1955 fiscal year. Lawrence continues as tht leader in numbers served; 
1,[|.10 as against 1,627 last year, but reflects again the decrease that has 
shown itself in the last few years in the city proper although this decrease 
is more than compensated for by corresponding increases in the other three 
locality leaders: Methuen, up from 339 last year to 526 this year; 
Haverhill, up from 266 to 313; Lowell, ' up from 168 to 226 e For the past 
several years both Haverhill and Lowell, of the top four, have shown steady 
yearly increase s 9 

In the nationality group, Ital^ - continues 'its hold' on first place for 
the third consecutive year with a total of 506 o Canada, formerly the 
leader almost yearly, was second this fiscal year with Ij.82, Syria and 
Lebanon which had moved up to fourtn place in 195U> moved this year to third 
place with 377, ahead of the United States with 302 and Great Britain with 
259. 

For the second consecutive year, Immigration Information has yielded 
the largest number in Statistical Detail, 579 > and has resulted in the 
completion of 123 immigration forms and 120 affidavits of support* 

There were this fiscal year I4.68 queries of a citizenship nature, re- 
sulting in the completion of 227 citizenship forms, of which 155 were 
concerned directly with the acquisition of citizenship* 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

The service total for the fiscal year 1957 was 1|,086, forty-eight less 
than the 1956 total of k,13km 

There was no appreciable change in Services rendered other than a note-' 
worthy increase in applications for First Paper, for Derivative Certificates, 
for Change of Status, and N-l*00s - and a dec1j.no of 135 in the informational 
category* The surprising number of first paper applications v.^.y be attributed 
to the special professional needs of the many alien Doctors in Worcester and 
environs, and the fairly large nunber of alien young men seeking enlistment 
in the Armed' Forces. The Change of Status cases consisted of ten Registry 
applications, six Pre-Exams, five Section 2i;5s, and three adjustment in 
temporary status. 



-10- 



In the fiscal year 1957, the Worcester Of fice • provided service for 
clients representing over forty-five nationalities, coming from thirty- 
eight communities in Central Massachusetts , The City of Worcester yielded 
three out of every four of our clients, but there was a sizeable total of 
one thousand from other cities and towns, It should be noted that many 
remote lands are represented on our Nationality Statistics Sheet * The 
Colleges and universities in the Worcester area - particularly Clark 
University and Worcester Polytechnic Institute - have comparatively large 
groups of foreign students in attendance, and all - at one time or another - 
find our "services valuable in the many problems that such a situation 
provokes. 

The change of Government in Poland and the subsequent liberalization 
of policy there were responsible for an awakened interest and hope among the 
people of Polish descent in this area. The' office assisted many in making 
Visitor's Affidavits and, in some instances,, petitions for eligible rela- 
tives. In three cases (out of approximately 25) the Visitor's Affidavits 
were successful, and two of the Petitions resulted in "the re-uniting of hus- 
band and wife after many years of enforced separation. 

The office had many inquiries concerning the Hungarian Refugees, There 
are now some forty of these in Worcester, the great majority of them still 
in Parolee status. In most instances they came from Camp Kilmer under 
sponsorship of church agencies or private individuals. They contacted our 
office on such matters as citizenship status, travel to Canada, or the 
bringing of relatives from Hungary proper. They were necessarily informed, 
of course, the favorable consideration in these items could only come with 
permanent status, 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

With the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 1957, the Commonwealth 
completed forty years of service to its residents. 

Our statistics show that kjhkS persons residing in the four Western 
Counties of the State received service from the Springfield Office, They 
sought help' and advice with their various problems:- principally concerning 
citizenship, immigration and emigration. 

People from thirty-eight countries are represented in that figure. 
Native born citizens of the United States headed the list of nationalities 
with natives of Canada, ' Italy, Poland, Ireland, Great Britain and Greece 
following "in that order. They came to us from forty-seven communities in 
the State, We had contact with forty-one persons, former residents of our 
State, who now reside in other parts of the country. 



- 11 - 



One of the functions of this office is to make contact i:it?i newly 
arrived immigrants destined to our area* Letters of welcome were sent to 
6i;8 of these immigrants extending to them an invitation to bring any of 
their problems to us* The majority of inquiries had to do with citizenship 
and location of schools that they tut/ attend to learn English and prepare 
for naturalization examination c 

This year, letters were sent to all of the .Americanization Supervisors 
in the various cities and towns bringing to their attention the functions 
and duties of this office and extending to them an invitation to refer 
pupils tc us v 

The greatest volume of work this year was under the heading of 
Immigration* Individuals who came from Italy and Greece under the Amended 
Refugee Relief Act (most of them ij.th preference immigrants) were assisted 
in preparing applications to bring their wives and children to the United 
States* We had many inquiries for spo , oring Hungarian Refugees© Publicitv 
on this subject was given by us in ovr local press. 

We assisted many people in preparing affidavits of support to sponsor 

relatives coming from Poland as Visitors* In all cases the persons in the 

United States had received letters from their relatives asking them to bring 
them here as tourists. 

During the course of the year, we handled a case of a man and his wife 
(former Displaced Persons) seeking removal at the Government's expense to 
the East Zone of Germany, They both were very much dissatisfied with their 
life in America* 

The most outstanding case of the year had to do with the adjustment of 
status of "a young man who fled from Czechoslovakia with a group in a home- 
made tank* He had been sent to the United States with the aid of Radio Free 
Europe* He and the others in the group had received international publicity 
and had been featured in many newspaper and magazine articles as well as 
having their escape reenacted on T*V* " He is now working as a mechanic for a 
leading automobile dealer in our area* He is married to a U«S* citizen and 
is very happy in his present surroundings* 

Although there has been a decrease in preparation of applications for 
citizenship at this office, our records shew that we are constantly called 
upon to render decisions about the citizenship status of individuals* 
These requests come not only from individuals but from various agencies in 
our area, particularly the Recruiting Office of the Armed Forces; personnel 
of the Strategic Air Command, West over Air Force Base and from employers* 

This Agent has attended the naturalization sessions at Springfield and 
has been very much impressed with the expeditious manner in which the United 
States Immigration & Naturalization Service handles these final hearings* 



o 

PQ 



> 



O 



1 

Statistical Eetap.1 
Services Given; 



For the month of 7/1/56 - 6/30/fr 



I. INFORMATION 



1. Booklets, forms, blanks. 

2. Citizenship 

3. Immigration 

4. Travel 

5. Other 



p 

fen 






1 

* o 



h3 
5 



8974 



9^-3 



Office at 
l&L 



206 



115 



850. 



6355 \ ^33 



ALL OFFICES 



50. 



Si 



711 



103 



II. FORMS FILLED 



V. 



6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 

\c • 

13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 



21-105 

N-300 

11-400 

N-600 i 

Other Hatur. ^orms 

1-131 

1-131 



i£22_J ZM- 



16 

150 



JZ. 



1536 l_2530_ J 1265jl6 i ^ 

^-T jl94 - 136 . 1^ 122 

802_ ^_JZ63_l3^801 

'8,88a 

52o 



468 



_.J22_j__842.^_iZ4 



103 \ 217 
Jj^-JO. 



; 123 

69 / 1 ,09.6 



jgL- j-- 708 ^ X1 ^ 6 : 9 ' 221 



11 



2064 



4?.4 



190 



_6_ 

_iz. 

_1Z 



1 



10 



8Z 



11 



44 



217 



151 



257 



18 



Other Iminig* ^orms 

aR-11 

1-90 



734 






222 

332- 

331 



Jfci 

108 



20 



...10 

.„25_ 



__3l 
16 I 32 



_4l 



_242_ J__321__J3i3i_ 
48j : 69 688 
80 ■ 370 
72 325- 
80 9 % 



48 



_41_1 
64 I 



42. 



32, 



III. EXECU 



AR-53 or 54 

3H OF AFFIDAVITS 



584 



1 2674 



119 



_94 

__22 

268 MTl4 



11 



52 



107 



1QZ. 



1029 
622 



50 ■ 454 



206 1291 



17. Affidavit of suooort 

18. Affidavit of facts 

19. Other notarial 

20. Assurances _^ 



2222 



26 



1$3__|_ 302__„13L 

133 j 



535 



JhAQl 



120 



1 75 I 209 285 



Ci 



5 



J3i_ 



24 



11 



151 



223 



21 



141_1_154_^_J02 132Z. 

1 - i - Z£_ 



IV. OTHER SERVICES 



7261 



iQ5. 



283 i 162 



21. 
22, 

23. 
24. 

25. 



Change of Status_ 
Appearance at hearings 
Interpretation & 

Letters 

Other 



266 



Trans. 



1.04 
136 



.11 — I 

b i 



___£ 



11 



315 8,5 26 

24 32 5 



108 



r 



13 



103 



11 



6034 



21 



438 



_41_ 



154 ] 149 I 104 
109 1 ; 84. 



687S 



26c 



IHT3RVI3W 



1801 



216 



62 



514 



325 2,9] 



26. Displaced Persons Interview 22 

2?. Hewcomer Interview j 1677 

2.8. Refugee Interview 102 



A 



215. 



?:0_ " ; 5 04 ' 258 271-' 



4 



iz 



IV c 



/k 



26,609"73.547" "2,865" 4,445 j 4086 ; 4l.. 



ALL OFFICES 

7/1/56 - 6/30/57 
1. Albania 



2. Africa 



3. Armenia (R. or 



4. Australia 



BOSTON 
flation a 



FALL 
RIVHR 
lity ancL 



JH2_ 



20. 



rj~ 92 



LAwREHCE 

:1m ic Stat.i 



SPRING- ! VIOR- 
FISLD CESTiS 
sties 



S 



3 



5±_ 

6. 



Austria 



Belgium 



7 . Bulgaria 



178 

59 



6 
18" 



4 
T5" 

ii 



8. Canada 



£. Centra l America 

11. 



W? 



108 



China 



Czechoslovakia 



508 



"Bo- 



ll 



Ji I 



3 

T 



251 



W 



TT 



109 



12. Denmark 



3gypt 



is 



Estonia 



86 



12 



84 



15. Finland 



16. France 



17. Germany 



18. Or eat Britain 

19. Greece 



20. Hungary 



21. 



22. 



Iceland 
India 



49 



3 



295 



956 



"25" 



1071 ; 170 



1071 



110 



296 



9 



129 



19 
18' 
2 

39^" 



ioi_ 



TW 



9 



13 



5 



_21_ 

Q 



9 



2 

"^50 



7 



9 



20 



6v 



25 



o 



109 



"24" 



23 



^5 



23. Indonesia 
24~ Iran 



23 



3< 



j 



9 



25. i raq 



26. Ireland*") 



27 

2177 



27. Israel 



Zo 



23 



28. Italy" 



1830 



121 



29. Japan 



30. Jordan 



102 



23 



38 



36" 



3o£~ 



11 



5 



W 



"23 

T 



T 



10 



91 



TOTAL 



219 

_36 
?M 

~WF 

— gzr 

139 

"W 

T2"5 

112 

'31 

52 

1ST 



151 



28T 



24? 



U 



12 



325 



37~4 



^ 



217 

235 



2W 



27 

T 



1 



586 

1775 

"201%" 

1752 
27 

~2j 

"13" 



279 



_18_ 
513 



30 

2MT 

_I8_ 
flf44 



OEL 



45 



31. Korea 



32. Latvia 



87 



T 



W 



FT 



Lithuania 



581 



T 



2 



06 



12 



"&" 



8 



__2? 

196 



416 



851 



Mexico 



29 



Jt 



35. Netherlands 



36. New"" Zealan d 



177 



37. 



Norway 



3 



Pakistan 



129 



1 — 



170 



39. Palestine 



7 



40. Philippines 

41 . Poland 



1130 



35 



4 



58 



20 



_260. 
7 



112 



W 



t ■. 



I 



299 



392 



T 

"9T 



34~ 



"235" 



^35" 



—89" 
~Z9T 
—89- 



42. Portug al 

43. Rumania 



379 [ 1403 



59 



44. South America 



15L. Spain , 



46. Sy/eden 



47. Switzerland 



48. 
^97 



Syria & Lehanor 



Turkey (Not 'Ai 
meniaj 



50. Trieste 



51. 

327 



Ukraine 



u.s.s.:i. 



347 



United States 



West Indies 



55. 
SI 



Yugosl 



avia 



76 



210 



5 



T 



"8" 



i2 



130 



61 



201 



33 



8 



10 



4 



10 
"2F 



+-»- 



"33" 



3 



14" 



139 



252 



T 



119 



3B80" 



529 



"SB" 



14 



377 



15 



T 



"296 



W 



4- 



"807" 



"8" 



39 



35 



T 



"6o4~ 



TS 



Other ^ountEiej 137 



JP^.^OQ 



3 - ^47 



"77 
302" 



3 



39 



15 



f 355 



T 



TB" 



T 



T3J 



T4T 



750" 



97 



18" 



- 



T38" 



? .fl^ 14.445 



~44T 
~T2~ 



T247" 
3977" 
~337~ 



13 



77 



4.086 



121 
' 357 
41.552 








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